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Contents September - November 2002

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This issue of Australian Humanities Review is dedicated to the memory of Dorothy Hewett

Essays and papers

Prompted by her response to the fly-away plastic bag in American Beauty, Gay Hawkins's paper, Documentary Affect: Filming Rubbish, theorises cinematic affect and considers Roland Barthes' observation that "life consists of these little touches of solitude".

In Which Rabbit-Proof Fence? Empathy, Assimilation, Hollywood, Tony Hughes D'aeth examines the way Philip Noyce's film is being positioned within an emerging history of the Stolen Generations.

Reviews and Interviews

Yao Souchou reviews Kam Louie's landmark study Theorising Chinese Masculinity: Society and Gender in China.

In Faking It for Real, K.K. Ruthven's Book of Literary Fraud, Ken Ruthven's book,
Faking Literature, is reviewed by Martin Wechselblatt.

Rae Frances reviews Cassandra Pybus and Hamish Maxwell-Stewart, American Citizens, British Slaves: Yankee Political Prisoners in an Australian Penal Colony 1839-1850.

Genocide and Colonialism – in conversation with Lorenzo Veracini, Ann Curthoys and John Docker discuss some of the issues at stake for Australian Aboriginal history in current international debates about the definitions of genocide.

Excerpts

Featuring sections from two essays that appeared in the inaugural issue of Cultural Studies Review including Suvendrini Perera's "A Line in the Sea", which examines the Tampa crisis;

and Geert Lovink's study of representations of the dot.com crash,"After the Dotcom Crash: Recent Literature on Internet, Business and Society".

News

Hard Currency takes a look at the UTS Review which has been reborn as The Cultural Studies Review. The complete contents for the first issue can be viewed by following this link. Two essays are included in this issue of Australian Humanities Review: Suvendrini Perera's "A Line in the Sea" and Lovink's study of representations of the dot.com crash,"After the Dotcom Crash: Recent Literature on Internet, Business and Society".

In e m u s e

Last issue's Leaving "ME" saw Gillian Whitlock consider the exodus of humanities academics from Australian universities. Her essay has had responses from Philip Neilsen, Head of Creative Writing and Cultural Studies at QUT, and Nicholas Birns, Editor of Antipodes, New School University, New York.

In good oil

Check out some new conferences. This section is being updated continually.




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